Steroid skin atrophy reversible

Yes, I have been diagnosed with fat pad atrophy. I was advised by my podiatrist to wear shoes with 1-1 1/2 inch heel to take the weight off my heels. Sadly now I fear I am getting it in my front pads so am wondering if I should now wear flat ones?
My podiatrist made me custom carbon fibre orthotics.
He says I won’t recover unless I use These all the time but they are 3/4 length, hard and I much prefer the good quality shop ones with gel heels.
He diagnosed both Plantar Fasciitis FPA over a year ago. The former is much better but the FPA worsening. What would you recommend I do? Should I stick with what feels most comfortable?
Thank you.

Laws and Penalties:  Concerns over growing illegal AAS abuse by teenagers, and many of the just discussed long-term effects, led Congress in 1991 to place the whole AAS class of drugs into Schedule III of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).  Under this legislation, AAS are defined as any drug or hormonal substance, chemically and pharmacologically related to T (other than estrogens, progestins, and corticosteroids) that promotes muscle growth.  The possession or sale of AAS without a valid prescription is illegal.  Since 1991, simple possession of illegally obtained AAS carry a maximum penalty of one year in prison and a minimum $1,000 fine if this is an individual’s first drug offense.  The maximum penalty for trafficking (selling or possessing enough to be suspected of selling) is five years in prison and a fine of $250,000 if this is the individual’s first felony drug offense.  If this is the second felony drug offense, the maximum period of imprisonment and the maximum fine both double.  While the above listed penalties are for federal offenses, individual states have also implemented fines and penalties for illegal use of AAS.  State executive offices have also recognized the seriousness of AAS abuse and other drugs of abuse in schools. For example, the State of Virginia enacted a law that will allow student drug testing as a legitimate school drug prevention program (48, 49).

The treatment for Testicular Atrophy is based on the underlying cause for the disease and then treating the cause. While taking the history of the individual, the physician will have knowledge of whether the individual has a prior history of medical conditions like trauma, mumps, STDs etc. and thus treatment will be formulated based on this information. In majority of the cases, Testicular Atrophy is not reversible and the testicle remains shrunken permanently, although if this condition is detected early enough then are some chances of partial recovery from testicular atrophy and further damage to the testicle can also be prevented. Citing an example, if Testicular Atrophy is caused due to excessive alcohol abuse then abstaining from alcohol completely may prevent further damage to the testicle. Timely treatment of sexually transmitted diseases also goes a long way in helping prevent permanent damage to the testicles. If the individual is suffering from a medical condition like testicular torsion then prompt treatment of this condition with surgery may reverse Testicular Atrophy. Additionally, hormone replacement therapy may also be prescribed for the affected individual. Also, certain lifestyle alterations like regular exercises, eating a healthy diet, and remaining sexually active also help in preventing Testicular Atrophy.

Parameters No. treated 40 Females 23 Males 17 No. with Atopic Dermatitis 15 No. with Psoriasis vulgaris 25 Mean age (years) 43 (range 22-57) Mean duration of treatment with Group III or IV topical steroids (years) 16 (range 6-25) Localization of skin atrophy:   Extremities 40 Face 28 Trunk 12 Concomitant Diseases:   Arthritis 7 Hypertonia 6 Rhinitis allergica 4 Concomitant medication:   Antiflogistica 6 Antihistamines 2 Antihypertensive drugs 5 Table 2.
Clinical evaluation of severity of symptoms and signs of skin atrophy at baseline and at end of treatment.

Clinical parameters Mean severity at baseline Mean severity at end of treatment Decreased thickness of skin (range 2-3) Laxity (range 2-3) Purpura/Echymoses (range 1-3) Dryness Teleangiectasia (range 2-3) (range 1-2) Table 3.
Mean epidermal and dermal thickness, skin elasticity, erythemal and moisture indexes at baseline and after 8 months of treatment with Vivida of 40 patients with corticosteroid induced skin atrophy.
Parameters Baseline 8 months Epidermal thickness (mm) (-) (-) Dermal thickness (mm) (-) (-) Elasticity Index 44 (39-53) 74 (65-78) Erythemal Index (-) (-) Moisture Index (11-37) (75-97)

There is some evidence that sun exposure can accelerate steroid-induced skin atrophy, the development of which can be limited by protecting the skin, particularly the face and arms, from the sun.  Daily use of a broad-spectrum sunscreen (UVB and UVA block) and appropriate protective clothing is recommended. 10 , 12 - 14   Patients on corticosteroids should also be encouraged to regularly use moisturisers on their arms and legs, as these may reduce bruising and tearing of the skin from minor trauma. 11   Evidence suggests that topical tretinoin can increase the epidermal thickness of sun-damaged atrophic skin, but long-term use may be necessary. 14   In dermatological practice, topical retinoids are used to help reverse skin atrophy caused by sun exposure or corticosteroid use.

Steroid skin atrophy reversible

steroid skin atrophy reversible

Parameters No. treated 40 Females 23 Males 17 No. with Atopic Dermatitis 15 No. with Psoriasis vulgaris 25 Mean age (years) 43 (range 22-57) Mean duration of treatment with Group III or IV topical steroids (years) 16 (range 6-25) Localization of skin atrophy:   Extremities 40 Face 28 Trunk 12 Concomitant Diseases:   Arthritis 7 Hypertonia 6 Rhinitis allergica 4 Concomitant medication:   Antiflogistica 6 Antihistamines 2 Antihypertensive drugs 5 Table 2.
Clinical evaluation of severity of symptoms and signs of skin atrophy at baseline and at end of treatment.

Clinical parameters Mean severity at baseline Mean severity at end of treatment Decreased thickness of skin (range 2-3) Laxity (range 2-3) Purpura/Echymoses (range 1-3) Dryness Teleangiectasia (range 2-3) (range 1-2) Table 3.
Mean epidermal and dermal thickness, skin elasticity, erythemal and moisture indexes at baseline and after 8 months of treatment with Vivida of 40 patients with corticosteroid induced skin atrophy.
Parameters Baseline 8 months Epidermal thickness (mm) (-) (-) Dermal thickness (mm) (-) (-) Elasticity Index 44 (39-53) 74 (65-78) Erythemal Index (-) (-) Moisture Index (11-37) (75-97)

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