Steroid shot for allergies while breastfeeding

How often cortisone injections are given varies based on the reason for the injection. This is determined on a case-by-case basis by the health care practitioner. If a single cortisone injection is curative, then further injections are unnecessary. Sometimes, a series of injections might be necessary; for example, cortisone injections for a trigger finger may be given every three weeks, to a maximum of three times in one affected finger. In other instances, such as knee osteoarthritis, a second cortisone injection may be given approximately three months after the first injection, but the injections are not generally continued on a regular basis.

As with any medication, there are possible side effects or risks involved.  Common risks from steroid injections include pain at the injection site, bruising due to broken blood vessels, skin discolouration and aggravation of inflammation.  Rarer risks include allergic reactions, infection, tendon rupture and serious injury to bones called necrosis.  Long term side effects (depending on frequency and dose) include thinning of skin, easy bruising, weight gain, puffiness in the face, higher blood pressure, cataract formation, and osteoporosis (reduced bone density).  Steroid injections may be given every 3-4 months but frequent injections may lead to tissue weakening at the injection site and is not recommended.  Side effects do not happen in everyone and vary from person to person.

Acetaminophen (Tylenol and generic) or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, such as ibuprofen (Advil and generic) or naproxen (Aleve and generic) are good first-choice drugs to treat lower-back pain. But NSAID prescription medication, such as diclofenac , could be considered if those aren't sufficient. Be wary of narcotic pain relievers—opioids such as hydrocodone (Vicodin and generic), oxycodone (Oxycontin and generic), oxycodone and aspirin (Percodan and generics), or oxycodone with acetaminophen (Percocet and generic) to treat your back pain. They are only moderately effective in treating long-term chronic pain , and their effectiveness can diminish over time. They have also not been studied sufficiently for long-term use.

I just had my second in just under two months for an issue at L5/S1 in my back. I suffer from both degenerative disc disease and spinal stenosis AND i have a bulging disc there. So, it’s been going on off and on since about 2012 and in total, I’ve had five injections now. They have helped for a period of time but certainly not permanent. And PT has not helped at all. My doctor has told me that because it’s at L5/S1, insurance will outright deny coverage for surgery UNTIL we’ve tried basically every other remedy including the injections. So, I’m at a loss. The pain is absolutely debilitating and pain meds don’t work either so what is a person to do???

Steroid shot for allergies while breastfeeding

steroid shot for allergies while breastfeeding

I just had my second in just under two months for an issue at L5/S1 in my back. I suffer from both degenerative disc disease and spinal stenosis AND i have a bulging disc there. So, it’s been going on off and on since about 2012 and in total, I’ve had five injections now. They have helped for a period of time but certainly not permanent. And PT has not helped at all. My doctor has told me that because it’s at L5/S1, insurance will outright deny coverage for surgery UNTIL we’ve tried basically every other remedy including the injections. So, I’m at a loss. The pain is absolutely debilitating and pain meds don’t work either so what is a person to do???

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